ISEECI Archive

Mission

ISEECI’s mission is to assess ecosystem-wide impacts of climate across the UC Natural Reserve System, linking plant and animal studies from the oceans to mountaintops. ISEECI leverages the UC Natural Reserve System as a biologically and geographically diverse laboratory to study effects of climate change on California ecosystems, with major implications for the state’s citizens. Our efforts are focused around four major research themes:

  • Environmental and Ecological History
  • Assessing Ecosystem-wide Adaptation to Future Climate Scenarios
  • Experimental Approaches to Climate Impacts Across Large Gradients
  • Next Generation Sampling to Archive Genomic Information

ISEECI is also focused on providing Californians with the most up-to-date and synthetic assessments of the impacts of climate on ecosystem health, and cascading impacts of the potential degradation of ecosystem services on their lives. Research Goals: Climate history: assessing historical variation in climate impacts using growth rings of woody plants and bones of fish to reconstruct climate statewide. This level of precision has not been collected on a statewide level and will provide an unprecedented window into the climate history, including records of drought and fire; Land histories from prehistory to current: working with Environmental Historians to assemble detailed land use histories for reserve locations, discovering forgotten but invaluable scientific research, and finding time capsules of genetic data contained within museum specimens; Coastal/terrestrial linkages: linkages between ocean circulation/upwelling and the coastal terrestrial ecosystems are vital since much of the population lives in the coastal zone, but are not well understood. Climate change directly affects the resilience of coast systems; e.g., coastal fog is declining.

Through ISEECI we will coordinate climatologists, ecologists and atmospheric chemists (amongst others), generating more accurate projections of coastal impacts of climate change, aiding management and protection of these iconic regions. While our initial efforts are focused on iconic California Ecosystem such as the magnificent redwood forests and red cedar forests of coastal California, we are developing projects to monitor the giant redwood forests of the Sierra Nevada and the ancient limber pine and bristlecone pines of the White Mountains. Studying the future: by identifying sites that currently have climates that key reserves will have in 30-50 years, we can learn how those ecosystems function and evolved, and the predict the chances of animals and plants migrating as climate shifts. This research is critical to forecasting changes in reserves, identifying sites that could be biotic refuges, and developing much needed strategies to manage reserves given unprecedented climatic change. Partnering with DroughtNet: a global consortium assessing ecosystems sensitivity to drought by building precipitation shelters that exclude up to 60% of the precipitation: We hope to add 7 NRS sites, with new instrumentation and experimental plots to improve high resolution modelling of ecosystem responses. Coordinated global efforts will tease out underlying mechanisms governing ecosystem response to changes in climate that can be used to improve high-resolution modelling of ecosystem responses. Climate Change Observatory spanning terrestrial and marine ecosystems of California: developing new instrumentation systems across the NRS system to study ecosystem-wide levels of carbon storage and flux. This information will be vital for development of Cap and Trade programs, mandated by AB 32.


Climate history

Assessing historical variation in climate impacts using growth rings of woody plants and bones of fish to reconstruct climate statewide.

This level of precision has not been collected on a statewide level and will provide an unprecedented window into the climate history, including records of drought and fire;

Land histories from prehistory to current

Working with Environmental Historians to assemble detailed land use histories for reserve locations, discovering forgotten but invaluable scientific research, and finding time capsules of genetic data contained within museum specimens;

Coastal/terrestrial linkages

Linkages between ocean circulation/upwelling and the coastal terrestrial ecosystems are vital since much of the population lives in the coastal zone, but are not well understood. Climate change directly affects the resilience of coast systems; e.g., coastal fog is declining. Through ISEECI we will coordinate climatologists, ecologists and atmospheric chemists (amongst others), generating more accurate projections of coastal impacts of climate change, aiding management and protection of these iconic regions.

While our initial efforts are focused on iconic California Ecosystem such as the magnificent redwood forests and red cedar forests of coastal California, we are developing projects to monitor the giant redwood forests of the Sierra Nevada and the ancient limber pine and bristlecone pines of the White Mountains.

Studying the future

By identifying sites that currently have climates that key reserves will have in 30-50 years, we can learn how those ecosystems function and evolved, and the predict the chances of animals and plants migrating as climate shifts.

This research is critical to forecasting changes in reserves, identifying sites that could be biotic refuges, and developing much needed strategies to manage reserves given unprecedented climatic change.

Partnering with DroughtNet

A global consortium assessing ecosystems sensitivity to drought by building precipitation shelters that exclude up to 60% of the precipitation: We hope to add 7 NRS sites, with new instrumentation and experimental plots to improve high resolution modelling of ecosystem responses. Coordinated global efforts will tease out underlying mechanisms governing ecosystem response to changes in climate that can be used to improve high-resolution modelling of ecosystem responses.

Climate Change Observatory spanning terrestrial and marine ecosystems of California

Developing new instrumentation systems across the NRS system to study ecosystem-wide levels of carbon storage and flux. This information will be vital for development of Cap and Trade programs, mandated by AB 32.

UC Natural Reserve System

The UC Natural Reserve System has 41 different reserves in the state of California. For more information on these reserves please have a look here:


Resources

UCNRS Climate data

The UCNRS Climate Monitoring Network consists of 27 automated weather and climate monitoring stations. The stations are all constructed from similar, high precision Campbell equipment and use the same set of data collection protocols. The network was established through a collaborative effort between the UCNRS and the Desert Research Institute’s (DRI) Division of Atmospheric Sciences and the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. If you are using the data for your research please let us know.

Bibliographic Database

This is a bibliography of published work based on research done at or using the resources of the NRS. Examples include journal articles, theses, books, conference proceedings, film and artwork, etc. The NRS bibliography is maintained in Zotero and managed by the UCNRS information management group in conjunction with reserve directors. It consists of collections for each reserve, in total over 10,000 items from 1857 to present.

UCNRS Research metadata

Using the Reserve Application Management System (RAMS) you can query our database and discover information about research that has happened or is ongoing on the UC reserves.

UCNRS Species Lists & information

The NRS has compiled information about species found on the reserves, plants, vertebrates, and also has been working with iNaturalist to add more species.

UCNRS GIS information

Boundary data for the reserves can be found here, additional data may be available from the reserve managers, please contact them directly.

UCB Holo EcoInformatics Engine

Holos aims to digitize and aggregate many diverse biological and environmental collections into the Berkeley Ecoinformatics Engine (‘Ecoengine’), a web service that can be searched and visualized via graphical tools: Explore, Compare, and other Applications. The data in the Ecoengine is global in scope, and since much of the data is sourced from the University of California museums, reserves and partners, the data coverage for California is very good.

UCB Wieslander Vegetation Type Mapping

In the 1920s and 1930s Albert Everett Wieslander and several others explored much of California’s wilderness sampling vegetation, taking photographs, collecting plant specimens, and drawing detailed maps of what they found. These data represent a snapshot of California’s vegetation in the early 20th century, and are a valuable resource for comparative and conservation ecology. This website has more information about the collection, detailed information about using the data, and data downloads.